The Hardest Ultrabook – The impression is that HP is almost the only manufacturer not to have sought to give its first ultrabook a minimum thickness. No, it’s not at all great here. However, in comparison to other ultra-firstborns, the HP Folio 13 looks less stylish, although its maximum thickness fits well with the standard – 18mm.

The trick is that the minimum is exactly the same. What did this risky departure from fashion bring to the newcomer? At least the originality of the profile and room for a few additional connectors.

 

HP Folio 13 technical specifications

Operating system: Windows 7 Professional.

  • Processor: Intel Core i5-2467M (1.6 GHz).
  • Display: 13.3 inch, 1366×768 pixels, glossy.
  • RAM: 4 GB, DDR3-1333.
  • Stockage: SSD 128 Go.
  • Video adapter: Intel HD Graphics 3000.
  • Communications: Wi-Fi 802.11 b / g / n, Bluetooth 3.0 + HS.
  • Battery: 6 cells, 5300 mAh.
  • Ports and connectors: 1xUSB 3.0, 1xUSB 2.0, microphone and headphone jack, network port, HDMI, card reader.
  • Dimensions and weight: 318x220x18 mm, 1.49 kg.
  • Webcam: 1,3 MP.

Design and construction

But they are not alike. With 13-inch MacBook Air

It is impossible to refrain from the standard comparison with the well-known hero, the very first ultrabook, which is not an ultrabook at all, but a MacBook Air. In this, perhaps, even a slight violation of professional ethics is observed. Nevertheless, despite the slight similarity (due rather to the class of the device, and nothing else), both in design and in materials, and even in tactile sensations, Folio 13 is the son of his parents. HP ENVY (although HP singled out Ultrabooks as a separate series) to the bone, not Apple.

And their profile is also different: with the 13-inch MacBook Air

Unlike other ultrabooks, the Folio Profile is devoid of the trendy wedge, it’s even stricter. That’s why the Folio 13 doesn’t look as thin as its competition. And he unexpectedly weighs a lot – 1.5 kg.

Not that much, of course. You just expect this 13 inch companion to weigh a little less. But due to form and materials, the Folio 13 exudes a special kind of reliability and durability. Looks like: the thing is high quality and will serve a long time (unless, of course, no one has bothered to stuff stuff anywhere).

The case does not bend anywhere (even the cover, unlike other ultrabooks), does not crack. The opening angle is sufficient, about 130 degrees, that is, working with a laptop in your lap is possible and even comfortable.

The gravity is mainly due to the 6 cell battery (see below) and the metal case cover. The cover and the underside of the palm are in raw silver aluminum. They are perfectly combined with a dark, non-marking, very pleasant to the touch plastic base and frame around the screen, as well as a smooth black island-style keyboard. The “sub-keyboard” is also black (unlike the MacBook), the corner knobs are more rounded than the rest, which gives the keyboard a certain visual integrity.

There is a pair of vents at the bottom. To give the laptop “breathe” (and just to provide better grip), the manufacturers placed four rubberized feet on the bottom. In terms of construction and design, the Folio 13 is a true business laptop. Serious, quite stylish, but not glamorous, devoid of any “fantasy”.

 

Ports and connectors

The front part is empty and the halves of the laptop are secured to each other with two sturdy hinges. There is also an air vent on the back

In terms of numbers, the HP Folio 13 is the champion of the first-generation ultrabook league. Not the smallest thickness allowed to place on the side walls of the device not only traditional USB ports (one 3.0, the other – 2.0) and a combined mini headphone and microphone jack, but also a card reader , HDMI and even a full-fledged network connector. I suspect that many mobile users will prefer the extra slimline ports. Well, who knows. Not all users are equally practical.

Right side. There’s only one headphone audio output, combined with one microphone input, plus USB 2.0 All the most useful things left: HDMI, RJ-45, card reader, and USB 3.0. They are located quite closely, but basically they do not interfere with each other in their work.

 

Display

But the bezel around the screen is very thin and not shiny

Admiring the beautiful casing, observing the decent hardware jam of the HP Folio 13, once again wonder why ultrabook makers like to save so much on this point so important to any user detail – on the screen? No, I’m not saying he’s that bad. Normal, but nothing more. This high quality and beautiful case combined with a rather steep price tag clearly deserves a top class die.

Unfortunately, the manufacturer was limited to a standard TN screen with a diagonal of 13.3 inches and a resolution of 1366×768 pixels. Brightness, contrast, color gamut, viewing angles are all poor. And, of course, a glossy finish, where without it. And this despite the commercial orientation of the model.

 

Keyboard and touchpad

HP laptops often come with excellent keyboards, and the Folio 13’s, thankfully, doesn’t break that tradition. Only the down and up arrows have been reduced in size. The other keys on the island are quite large, with a clear, shallow stroke and a smooth surface. They are convenient for typing texts quickly, including when using the blind method. For those who prefer to look at the keyboard, the backlight can come in handy.

It is uniform – it is a plus, its brightness is not regulated – it is relative, but a minus. Sometimes its white glow seems too piercing. It is very easy to activate the backlight using the dedicated function key in the top row. About, the characteristic of this top row (probably a characteristic unique to HP laptops) is “laptop” functions (for example, changing screen brightness or turning on Wi-Fi) are called here by default, while the Traditional F1-F12 are triggered in combination with Fn.

This is convenient for most users, but those who use different specific combinations will need to change their ways. The location of the pause key is also not standard. It fits on the huge Right Shift, standard 2.5 long buttons. However, I doubt you use this break that often. Personally, I only need it to call up the “System” menu. Oh yes, most likely, you can safely drink coffee on the Folio 13: the manufacturer ensures that the keyboard is protected from moisture.

I have to say the statement is quite plausible, but we haven’t verified it; who use different specific combinations will have to change their ways. The location of the pause key is also not standard. It fits on the huge Right Shift, standard 2.5 long buttons. However, I doubt you use this break that often. Personally, I only need it to call up the “System” menu. Oh yes, most likely you can safely drink coffee on the Folio 13: the manufacturer ensures that the keyboard is protected from moisture. I have to say the statement is quite plausible, but we haven’t verified it.

Who use different specific combinations will have to change their habits. The location of the pause key is also not standard. It fits on the huge Right Shift, standard 2.5 long buttons. However, I doubt you use this break that often. Personally, I only need it to call up the “System” menu. Oh yes, most likely you can safely drink coffee on the Folio 13: the manufacturer ensures that the keyboard is protected from moisture.

I have to say the statement is quite plausible, but we haven’t verified it You can safely drink coffee on Folio 13: the manufacturer guarantees that the keyboard is protected from moisture. I have to say the statement is quite plausible, but we haven’t verified it. You can safely drink coffee on Folio 13: the manufacturer guarantees that the keyboard is protected from moisture. I have to say the statement is quite plausible, but we haven’t verified it.

The touchpad is quite large and multi-touch. The keys on it are highlighted only with a pattern, they are rather tight, which will not appeal to everyone. Those who don’t like it can easily turn it off. To do this, it is enough to double-click on the upper left corner of its surface (there is a special drawing on it, of course, not knowing what it symbolizes is not so easy).

It seemed very convenient to me. In particular, the fact that it reacts quickly and clearly to touch, supports multi-touch gestures. For example, “poppy” scroll with two fingers and drag with three fingers, zoom.

 

System and performance

Some Ultrabooks come with SSDs instead of traditional mechanical hard drives, and the HP Folio 13 is one of those lucky ones. This means both performance gains and a more energy efficient and quieter laptop.

The experimental ultrabook has 128 GB of storage, 18 GB of the total is reserved for the Recovery section. Accessing this really speeds things up, especially when it comes to accidentally accessing files and exiting hibernation.

Like all other current ultrabooks, HP’s first born is based on the Sandy Bridge platform. Intel Core i5-2467M processor, 4 GB of RAM, in short, there is nothing to stop, the modern standard in its most typical manifestation. Its speed is in line with other ultrabooks with similar specifications. With the exception of the Dell XPS 13, which for unknown reasons slightly outperforms its competition in terms of subjective feel and synthetic benchmark.

Thus, with a similar configuration in the 3DMark Vantage test, the HP Folio 13 scored 1521 points, the Aser Aspire S3 – 1494 and the Dell XPS 13 took the lead with a result of 1700. In PCMark, the hero of our review received 3183 points, Dell – 3376. Aspire S3 in this test lagged behind considerably,

Thus, the Folio 13 is an adequate machine for office tasks, watching movies and undemanding games. A few words about sound. “Dolby Advanced Audio” – reads the inscription on the speakers below the screen. They play pretty hard. If you are not concerned about the moral and ethical side of the matter, you can easily listen to music and watch movies in a noisy cafe. The sound quality of such a small case is decent, although far from ideal.

The laptop “sings” perfectly, but the low frequencies are usually not enough, and the highs, for my taste, are harsh. Everything is better in the headphones, although the sound is even sharper (here, however, a lot depends on the headphones themselves).

 

Autonomy, noise, heating

Battery life is perhaps the strongest point of the HP Folio 13. Due to its unattractive thickness (by ultrabook standards, of course), a 6-cell battery fits into the case. . It allows the device to operate in reading mode (minimum comfortable screen brightness, wireless modules are disabled) for 9 consecutive hours. But the best part is that in stressful mode (all inclusive, maximum screen brightness, Battery Eater test, classic mode) the laptop lasted a full 3 hours.

Working on the Internet (sometimes distracted while writing a review) at maximum screen brightness turned out without recharging for about 7 hours. Almost full time! At the same time, I cannot fail to note the rather strong heating of the bottom of the model in the center (as well as of the keyboard on the other side). I like to put my laptop on my lap, but it is better not to sit for long like this: the heat is eliminated precisely in the background.

Heating under high loads (for example, when performing the Battery Eater test) is noticeable, sometimes it just heats up, and this despite the fact that the cooling system had enough space to expand. Noise during operation is audible, especially when the cooling system is building up, however, its level can only be critical for the room of a irritable and insomniac person. I like to put my laptop on my lap, but it is better not to sit for a long time like this: the heat is eliminated precisely in the background.

Heating under high loads (for example, when performing the Battery Eater test) is noticeable, sometimes it just heats up, and this despite the fact that the cooling system had enough space to expand. Noise during operation is audible, especially when the cooling system is building up, however, its level can only be critical for the room of a irritable and insomniac person.

I like to put my laptop on my lap, but it is better not to sit for a long time like this: the heat is eliminated precisely in the background. Heating under high loads (for example, when performing the Battery Eater test) is noticeable, sometimes it just heats up, and this despite the fact that the cooling system had enough space to expand. Noise during operation is audible, especially when the cooling system is building up, however, its level can only be critical for the room of a irritable and insomniac person.

Execution of the Battery Eater test) is noticeable, sometimes it just heats up, and this despite the fact that the cooling system had enough space to expand. Noise during operation is audible, especially when the cooling system is building up, however, its level can only be critical for the room of a irritable and insomniac person.

Execution of the Battery Eater test) is noticeable, sometimes it just heats up, and this despite the fact that the cooling system had enough space to expand. Noise during operation is audible, especially when the cooling system is building up, however, its level can only be critical for the room of a irritable and insomniac person.

 

Competitors

All first-gen ultrabooks are roughly close to each other in performance and cost (with the exception of the more expensive MacBook Air and the affordable Acer Aspire S3). The best display among Windows ultrabooks is the Asus ZenBook UX31, the best keyboard is the HP Folio 13. The Dell XPS 13 is the fastest, HP is the longest, it has the most connectors, but so is the weight. Most important. The lightest among those reviewed is the Asus Zenbook.

 

conclusions

This rather durable and reliable set struck me as more masculine than feminine. In particular, due to the fact that it is heavier than all other 13 inch ultrabooks weighing 200 to 300 grams. And the extra millimeters in the size of the Folio 13 are unlikely to upset the stronger sex: thanks to them, the ultrabook has a larger battery (and, therefore, a longer autonomy) and a few additional connectors (HDMI, reader card, network port).

Combined with good ergonomics and a high-quality housing, the HP Folio 13 seems to me to be a powerful device for working on the road. Considering the original design and the presence of a number of important ports (especially Ethernet), we can safely recommend purchasing this laptop.

 

5 reasons to buy HP Folio 13:

Reliable housing;

  • Excellent backlit keyboard
  • Long battery life;
  • Lots of connectors (for Ultrabook standards)
  • Beautiful design that does not copy Apple.

2 reasons not to buy the HP Folio 13:

Great thickness and weight (according to ultrabook standards);

  • Poor screen.